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EARTHQUAKE

CHARTS

Data from USGS, EQCanada, EMSC-CSEM, GeoNet & GeoScience

Earthquakes, Past 24 Hours

(Earthquake Occurrences in the Western World)

Earthquakes, Magnitude 7 and Average, 1900-Present Chart

Magnitude 7 Earthquakes Worldwide, and Average, 1900-2014

magnitude 7 earthquakes, 1900-2014 average

Graph of Magnitude 7 Earthquakes and Average, Worldwide, 1900-2014.

Are magnitude 7 earthquakes increasing worldwide? The graph charts the frequency of magnitude 7 earthquakes worldwide between 1900 and 2014 and the projected average number.**

Verify these statistics at the Centennial Catalog, (for data between 1900 and 2002) and the U.S. Geological Survey (for data after 2002) with the following location:
Latitude 90.0N — 90.0S, Longitude 180.0W — 180.0E

For the most recent data, see the USGS Earthquake Feed
All earthquake data belongs to the U.S Geological Survey and is used with limited permission. This website is not affiliated with the USGS. See the USGS disclaimer here.

**Although their Facts and Statistics page is “no longer being maintained” the United States Geological Survey stated until 2012 that the average number of yearly magnitude 7 earthquakes is 15. See below:

Top of Page USGS Title Page and Logo

USGS No longer being maintained screen capture

Magnitude 7 Earthquake Averages USGS Screen Cap

Earthquakes, Magnitude 7, 1900-Present Chart

Magnitude 7 Earthquakes, Worldwide, 1900-2014

magnitude 7 earthquakes 1900-2014

Graph of Magnitude 7 Earthquakes, Worldwide, 1900-2014.

Are magnitude 7 earthquakes increasing worldwide? The graph charts the frequency of magnitude 7 earthquakes worldwide between 1900 and 2014.

Verify these statistics at the Centennial Catalog, (for data between 1900 and 2002) and the U.S. Geological Survey (for data after 2002) with the following location:
Latitude 90.0N — 90.0S, Longitude 180.0W — 180.0E
For the most recent data, see the USGS Earthquake Feed

All earthquake data belongs to the U.S Geological Survey and is used with limited permission. This website is not affiliated with the USGS. See the USGS disclaimer here.

Earthquakes, Nevada, 1990-Present Chart

Earthquakes, Nevada, 1990-2014

earthquakes nevada 1990-2014

Graph of Earthquakes, Nevada, United States, 1990-2014, Magnitude 2.0 and Greater.

Are earthquakes increasing in Nevada? The graph charts the frequency of earthquakes of magnitude 2.0 and greater in Nevada between 1990 and 2014.

Verify these statistics at the U.S. Geological Survey with the following location:
Latitude 42.0N – 38.7N, Longitude 120.0W – 114.0W
Latitude 38.6N – 36.0N, Longitude 118.4W – 114.0W
Latitude 35.9N – 35.5N, Longitude 115.9W – 114.7W
For the most recent data, see the USGS Earthquake Feed

All earthquake data belongs to the U.S Geological Survey and is used with limited permission. This website is not affiliated with the USGS. See the USGS disclaimer here.

Earthquakes, New Zealand, 1990-Present Chart

Total New Zealand Earthquakes, 1990-2014

earthquakes new zealand 1990-2014

Graph of Total New Zealand Earthquakes, 1990-2014, All Magnitudes.

Are earthquakes increasing in New Zealand? The graph charts the frequency of earthquakes of all magnitudes in New Zealand between 1990 and 2014. (Note that GeoNet is in the process of updating the earthquake information for a ‘gap’ between 2012 and part of 2013. The data for these years is an estimate only.)

Verify these statistics at The GeoNet Project with the following location:
Map Extent (New Zealand)
For the latest data see the Geonet Project’s Felt Earthquakes List

All earthquake data belongs to The GeoNet Project and Its Sponsors: Earthquake Commission (EQC), GNS Science and Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) and is reproduced with limited permission. None of these organizations endorse this website. See the GeoNet Project disclaimer here.

Earthquakes, Mexico, 1990-Present Chart

Earthquakes, Mexico, 1990-2014

earthquakes mexico 1990-2014

Graph of Earthquakes, Mexico, 1990-2014, Magnitude 2.0 and Greater.

Are earthquakes increasing in Mexico? The graph charts the frequency of earthquakes of magnitude 2.0 and greater in Mexico between 1990 and 2014. The arrow marks the change in USGS recording criteria: after 2008, only earthquakes of magnitude 4.5 and greater that occur outside of the United States are recorded unless they are felt or cause damage. In Mexico, which is in close proximity to the U.S., felt reports are relatively common. However, the USGS no longer automatically records all magnitude 2.0 earthquakes that occur.

Verify these statistics at the U.S. Geological Survey with the following location:
Latitude 32.3N – 3.7N, Longitude 116.9W – 93.5W
For the most recent data, see the USGS Earthquake Feed.

All earthquake data belongs to the U.S Geological Survey and is used with limited permission. This website is not affiliated with the USGS. See the USGS disclaimer here.